Matcha & Sea Salt Brownies

Brownie, or chocolate brownie, is generally considered as an American baked confection or dessert. A legend about the invention of brownie is that it came from Chicago’s Palmer House Hotel during the late 19th century when Bertha Palmer asked the pastry chef for a cake-like dessert for ladies attending the Chicago 1893 World Fair, and the dessert should be small and easily eaten from boxed lunches. That’s how the first brownie was created: topped with walnuts and apricot glaze. The brownies were well received and they are still probably being served today at the “The Palmer House Hilton” in Chicago.

The texture of chocolate brownie is somewhat between cake and cookie, with the addition of cocoa powder and chocolate. Some brownies are cakey, while some are dense and fudgy. Personally, I prefer the fudgy type of brownies, and that is exactly the texture of matcha brownies that I am going to share with you. Inspired by the addition of matcha salt as one of several traditional condiments for deep-fried tempura, I decided to add sea salt as well to my matcha brownies. People who have tried my recipe told me that these matcha brownies, or they prefer to call it “Greenies“, are definitely something to die for. What a sweet enormous compliment!

In order to achieve the vibrant green colour of matcha, make sure you choose high quality culinary grade matcha powder, otherwise the colour is going to be dull and yellowish. The smokey slight bitterness from matcha also neutralises the sweetness from white chocolate and sugar. Very often, I get question whether sugar amount in a recipe can be reduced. Normally, I would say “Yes, you can reduce sugar by 10 to 20%”, but NOT for this matcha brownies recipe. If the sugar is reduced, you would not have achieved the soft, gooey and fudgy texture.

Lastly, another reason why you shouldn’t reduce the sugar amount of this recipe is that, sea salt is sprinkled to balance the overall sweetness. More importantly, sea salt brings out a subtle umami flavour. So, a quick tip here: please, please, please get a good quality sea salt flakes, such as Maldon sea salt. It is worth investing in because it makes an enormous difference to your dessert.

Now, let’s get started. Follow my video on YouTube to make matcha and sea salt brownies:

Karlin Patisserie YouTube Channel

Ingredients: (yield: 7″ X 7″ square)

  • White chocolate 180g
  • Butter 140g
  • Egg 2 no. (room temperature)
  • Sugar 120g
  • Plain flour 100g
  • Matcha powder 15g
  • Dark chocolate chip, as needed
  • Sea salt flakes, as needed

Method:

  1. Preheat oven at 160 degree Celsius. Prepare a 7″ X 7″ square baking tray, and line with parchment paper.
  2. In a metal bowl, put in white chocolate and butter. Then, put it over a pot of simmering water, and stir occasionally to melt the white chocolate and butter. Let it cool to around body temperature (35-40C).
  3. Add in eggs. Use a whisk and mix until well combined.
  4. Add sugar, and mix until the mixture is smooth and sugar has dissolved.
  5. Mix in sifted plain flour and matcha powder to form a smooth batter.
  6. Pour brownie batter into the prepared baking tray.
  7. Sprinkle some chocolate chips on top, and followed by some sea salt flakes.
  8. Tap lightly on the countertop to remove large air bubble.
  9. Bake at 160 degree Celsius for about 25-30 minutes. Be careful not to over-bake the brownies. The surface should be still soft to touch but not sticking to your finger.
  10. Let it cool for about 10 minutes, and then remove the brownies from baking tray to cool down further on a cooling rack.
  11. When the brownies has cooled completely, wrap it with cling film and chill it for about 1 – 2 hours.
  12. Take brownies out from refrigerator, slice and serve.
I cut the matcha brownies into 16 square pieces.
Look at how fudgy and gooey it is!

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